Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Letters From Rapunzel by Sara Lewis Holmes

When I started reading Letters From Rapunzel by Sara Holmes, I was also reading other books simultaneously. I was not putting my best effort forward and I even almost quit reading because I thought I could see where the story was going. I can admit when I am wrong! I WAS WRONG...
When the main character begins her journey in this story she is writing letters to a mysterious Post Office Box whom she believes is her dad's mentor in life. Instead of signing the notes from herself, she is using the alias Rapunzel. Not because she does not want to be named, but because it is how she is feeling at the time. As the letters move on, the reader hears about the strife going on in Rapunzel's life, including her father's "Evil Spell." (Clinical Depression) I cannot reveal what happens in the course of the story because I want you to read for yourself, but let me tell you, I was not expecting the events in the climax and resolution of the story.
I really liked the format because it is always easy to convince a student to pick up a book that comes in letter form. For some reason it doesn't seem like a real book to them, I guess their eyes can trick them that way. :) But what I also liked was that the book wasn't too heavy. (No not weight, but heavy, you know...) There are so many students out there who have family members going through similar stories. Heck, I am betting there are even fifth graders going through Clinical Depression, as sad as that sounds.
I am going to recommend it for students who have a keen sense of humor and also a strong heart. I think some of the content may go over my student's heads, but I guarantee enough of it will stick that they will be thinking about it for a long time to come.
Links for your liking...
Sara Lewis Holmes- Website
Sara Lewis Holmes Blog- Read, Write, Believe
And just about everyone in the Kidlitosphere has read and reviewed the book...


3 comments:

Barbara O'Connor said...

I really enjoyed this book, too. Really got the issue right and made the character real. The letters added a lot to the pacing, too. I totally get what you are saying about its appeal because of the letter format.

Megan Germano said...

That is the same thought I had, but didn't include. It got the character of highly intellectual preteen who is also highly unmotivated because of circumstances in and out of school.
Also, yeah, letter, diary, journal format... it has always been an easy sell to 5th grade. They see less words on a page and dive right in. I take it anyway I can get it. :)

Jess said...

Sounds great :D *Rapunzel, Rapunzel, let down your hair...*